Biography

After almost forty years of work, Franco Aguggiaro, born in Vigonza, Italy and  great  traveler (not as a tourist, but  as a  researcher  always  searching exciting and challenging environments, where he would absolve and convey knowledge  and  culture), is still intimately tied to his first sensory “imprinting” the Venetian region land, with his colors, atmospheres, flavors, smells, contacts with the Venetian world of his childhood and adolescence, the rhythm of the local spoken language with its slow and sweet musicality. By painting he recovers the deep layers of the synaesthetic culture of his origins, when his definite, rich, supple layering of knowledge was subject to a  constant  revaluation  or,  better, a continuous  resurfacing.

Sometimes nostalgic (he’s been living in FtLauderdale,  Florida  for many years) but rich in moods and feelings, sometimes in urgent need of documentation of  the  losses  that  his sensorial memory has been suffering by erasing his ancient visions of his land, his people,  gestures tradition  and the material culture and states of mind connected to them, different “sense” of time and space, a different view of the reality of things, colors, depth and environmental  perspectives. The Venetian  region of the “memories of the senses” is very  different  from the  nostalgic views which  some  faded  memories of distant, lost, seldom enlightened by a photograph, from old magazines or books give us, always with disappointing results.

Franco Aguggiaro, instead nourishes  the  inner  eye  by  listening  to his inner voices, letting grow the emotion that revives his gesture, strengthens the color, meaning its emotional quality. The chromatic factor is no longer  perceived  a simply coating of  a picture, but  primarily as the  background  painting  of  matter which becomes  more  expressive  that descriptive,  while  absorbing  the  fickle perceptions that require a long time  of observation. During this time, he enters his picture at the level  of  the psychological dimension of its poetic evocation, to feel and understand the slight expressionist deformations of regular faces and bodies, especially in his Roman period,where the game of colors replaced the game of volumes and the sign would modulate, and make the contours of the  shapes  vibrant and  blurred, making the sense of existential discomfort and poverty suffered quietly, as a resigned acceptance of a widely shared and inevitable destiny, stand out. (Giorgio Segato)

Many Italian and international critics have written about Franco’s work, including F. Belfiori, F. Bellonzi, M. Biancale, R. Biasion, L. Borghese, M. Calabrese, R. Civello, C. Da Via, G. de Chirico, V. Fiore, V. Guzzi, D. Iavarone, V. Mariani, B. Morrini, F. Miele, E.F. Accrocca, E. Miscia, David Miller and many others.

Franco Aguggiaro was born in Vigonza Italy, in the province of Padova. In the late 1960’s, he studied design and artistic nude painting in Nice. He continued his art studies in London, Paris and Stockholm. He returned to Rome in the 1970’s, to study at the Academy of Art.

At the end of the 1970’s, Franco returned to  Stockholm to teach art and design. In the 1980’s, he opened an art studio in Rome, at Trastevere and began a working relationship with Mr. Ettore Russo (owner of Galleria La Barcaccia in Piazza di Spagna) who also discovered the Master Giorgio de Chirico. The relationship continued until the death of Mr. Russo in 1992. The same year Franco Aguggiaro was Knighted by Mr. Scalfaro, the President of the Republic of Italy.

Throughout his career, Franco’s associations with painter such as Giorgio de Chirico, Tommasi Ferroni, Kokocinski, Villoresi, Guzzi Schifano and many others, has afforded him the opportunity to learn the secrets of the most refined techniques of traditional and modern painting.

Establishing a residence in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida in 1994, Franco has established himself in the cultural community. In 1995, he was elected Cultural Chairman by the City of Ft. Lauderdale for Sister Cities International. In April of 2000, he became an American Citizen.

Many Italian and international critics have written about Franco’s work, including F. Belfiori, F. Bellonzi, Berenice, M. Biancale, R. Biasion, Toni Bonavita, L. Borghese, M. Calabrese, R. Civello, C. Da Via, G. De Chirico, V. Fiore, V. Guzzi, D. Iavarone, Athos Magini, V. Mariani, B. Morrini, F. Miele, E.F. Accrocca, E. Miscia, David Miller, V. Scorza, M. Vaizey, Giorgio Segato.